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Modelling stress reduction techniques of cold compression and stretching in wrought aluminium alloy products

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journal contribution
posted on 2014-03-04, 10:25 authored by David A. Tanner, J.S. Robinson
Heat treatable aluminium alloy aerospace products undergo a rapid quench from the solution heat treatment temperature into water/organic quenchant/spray quenching system during processing. As a result of this rapid quenching operation, residual stresses of yield strength magnitude can develop, leaving the material in an unsuitable condition for further machining operations and for service. Rectilinear, open-die forgings are generally cold compressed after quenching to relieve residual stresses. The effect of friction during cold compression between the forging and the steel compression platens, increasing/decreasing the amount of cold compression plastic deformation, natural ageing prior to cold compression, cold compression direction (LT v L v ST) and applying cold compression in 'bites' on residual stress magnitudes is not generally available. Residual stress development during quenching is modelled using the finite element technique and the effect on the final residual stress magnitude of varying these process parameters is evaluated. The effect of stretching to relieve residual stresses and the effect on residual stress magnitudes of sectioning samples of the material is also analysed using the finite element technique. The models of each of the stress relieving techniques are compared both by observing stress magnitudes and by using the FE model to predict the results from a layer removal technique. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

History

Publication

Finite Elements in Analysis and Design;39, (5-6), 369-386

Publisher

Elsevier

Note

peer-reviewed

Rights

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Finite Elements in Analysis and Design. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Finite Elements in Analysis and Design, 39, (5-6), pp. 369-386, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168-874X(02)00079-3

Language

English

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