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Participatory implementation research in the field of migrant health: sustainable changes and ripple effects over time

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journal contribution
posted on 2020-03-26, 14:42 authored by Maria van den Muijsenbergh, Joseph W. LeMaster, Parmida Shahiri, Michele Brouwer, Mohammed Hussain, Christopher Dowrick, Maria Papadakaki, Christos Lionis, Anne E. MacFarlane
Objective: This study aimed to explore whether positive impacts were sustained and unanticipated ripple effects had occurred four years after the implementation of interventions to improve cross-cultural communication in primary care. Background: Sustaining the implementation of change using complex interventions is challenging. The EU-funded “RESTORE” study implemented guidelines and training on cross-cultural communication in five Primary Care sites in Europe, combining implementation theory (Normalisation Process Theory) with participatory methodology (participatory learning and action—PLA). There were positive impacts on knowledge, skills and clinical routines. Design, setting and participants: Four of the five original sites (England, Ireland, Greece, The Netherlands) were available for this qualitative follow-up study. The study population (N = 44) was primary healthcare staff and migrants, most of whom had participated in RESTORE. Intervention; main outcome measures: PLA-style focus groups and interviews explored routine practice during consultations with migrants. Etic cards based on the effects of RESTORE stimulated the discussion. Deductive framework analysis was performed in each country followed by comparative data analysis and synthesis. Results: Changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour with regard to consultations with migrants were sustained and migrants felt empowered by their participation in RESTORE. There were ongoing concerns about macro level factors, like the political climate and financial policies, negatively affecting migrant healthcare. Conclusion: There were sustained effects in clinical settings, and additional unanticipated positive ripple effects, due in part, from the participatory approach employed

History

Publication

Health Expectations;

Publisher

Wiley and Sons Ltd

Note

peer-reviewed

Language

English

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