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Report on the first SEMAT workshop on general theory of software engineering (GTSE 2012)

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journal contribution
posted on 2013-11-11, 14:18 authored by Paul Ralph, Pontus Johnson, Howell Jordan
Many academic disciplines have general theories, which apply across the discipline and underlie much of its research. Examples include the Big Bang theory (cosmology), Maxwell’s equations (electrodynamics), the theories of the cell and evolution (biology), the theory of supply and demand (economics), and the general theory of crime (criminology). Software engineering, in contrast, has no widely-accepted general theory. Consequently, the SEMAT Initiative organized a workshop to encourage development of general theory in software engineering. Workshop participants reached broad consensus that software engineering would benefit from better theoretical foundations, which require diverse theoretical approaches, consensus on a primary dependent variable and better instrumentation and descriptive research.

History

Publication

ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes;38 (2), pp. 26-28

Publisher

Association for Computing Machinery

Note

peer-reviewed

Other Funding information

SFI

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"© ACM, 2013 . This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published inACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, 38(2), pp. 26-28, http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2439976.2439999

Language

English

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