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Substrate topography: a valuable in vitro tool, but a clinical red herring for in vivo tenogenesis

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posted on 2018-11-22, 15:11 authored by Andrew English, Ayesha Azeem, Kyriakos Spanoudes, Eleanor Jones, Bhawana Tripathi, Nandita Basu, Karrina McNamaraKarrina McNamara, Syed A.M. Tofail, Niall Rooney, Graham Riley, Alan O'Riordan, Graham Cross, Dietmar Hutmacher, Manus J. Biggs, Abhay Pandit, Dimitrios I. Zeugolis
Controlling the cell–substrate interactions at the bio-interface is becoming an inherent element in the design of implantable devices. Modulation of cellular adhesion in vitro, through topographical cues, is a well-documented process that offers control over subsequent cellular functions. However, it is still unclear whether surface topography can be translated into a clinically functional response in vivo at the tissue/device interface. Herein, we demonstrated that anisotropic substrates with a groove depth of ∼317 nm and ∼1988 nm promoted human tenocyte alignment parallel to the underlying topography in vitro. However, the rigid poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) substrates used in this study upregulated the expression of chondrogenic and osteogenic genes, indicating possible tenocyte trans-differentiation. Of significant importance is that none of the topographies assessed (∼37 nm, ∼317 nm and ∼1988 nm groove depth) induced extracellular matrix orientation parallel to the substrate orientation in a rat patellar tendon model. These data indicate that two-dimensional imprinting technologies are useful tools for in vitro cell phenotype maintenance, rather than for organised neotissue formation in vivo, should multifactorial approaches that consider both surface topography and substrate rigidity be established.

Funding

Using the Cloud to Streamline the Development of Mobile Phone Apps

Innovate UK

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Development of a structure identification methodology for nonlinear dynamic systems

National Research Foundation

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History

Publication

Acta Biomaterialia;27, pp. 3-12

Publisher

Elsevier

Note

peer-reviewed

Other Funding information

EI, SFI, HRB, IRC

Rights

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Acta Biomaterialia. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Acta Biomaterialia, 27, pp. 3-12, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2015.08.035

Language

English

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