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Good jobs - but places for women?

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journal contribution
posted on 2016-11-18, 10:13 authored by Pat O'ConnorPat O'Connor
This article is concerned with men and women's experience of elite positions and with the extent to which such positions are seen as places for women, so as to provide an insight into their commitment to continuing in them. Senior management in universities are elite positions in terms of income; those who occupy them are relatively powerful internally, although relatively powerless in relation to the state and the market. Drawing on a purposive study of those at the top three levels (i.e. presidential, vice-presidential, and dean) in public universities, it finds little difference between men and women's perceptions of the advantages/disadvantages of these positions. However, in a context where roughly four-fifths of those in university senior management are men [O'Connor, P. 2014. Management and Gender in Higher Education. Manchester: Manchester University Press.], at the level of organisational narratives and at the interactional level, gender differences persist. These differences are reflected in variation in commitment to continuing in senior management positions.

History

Publication

Gender and Education;27 (3), pp. 304-319

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Note

peer-reviewed

Rights

This is an Author's Original Manuscript of an article whose final and definitive form, the Version of Record, has been published in Gender and Education 2015 copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540253.2015.1021302

Language

English

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