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Vitamin K status and inflammation are associated with cognition in older Irish adults

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posted on 2022-08-17, 11:23 authored by Annemarie Kiely, Guylaine Ferland, Bouchra Ouliass, Paul W. O'Toole, HELEN PURTILLHELEN PURTILL, Eibhlís O'ConnorEibhlís O'Connor
Studies have shown associations between reduced vitamin K status and poor cognitive function. However, despite this apparent link, direct studies measuring cognitive function, vitamin K status and inflammation are lacking. In the current study, The ELDERMET cohort was investigated to identify associations between cognition, vitamin K status and inflammation. The primary aim of the ELDERMET study was to investigate the relationship between gut bacteria, diet, lifestyle and health in 500 older Irish adults. Significant differences in serum phylloquinone, dietary phylloquinone and inflammatory markers were found across varying levels of cognitive function, after controlling for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), triglycerides and blood pressure. In addition, significantly higher levels of dietary phylloquinone were found in those with better cognition compared to those with the poorest function. Higher levels of inflammatory were also associated with poor cognition. Furthermore, both dietary and serum phylloquinone were significant independent predictors of good cognitive function, after controlling for confounders. This study highlights the importance of dietary vitamin K as a potentially protective cognitive factor; it also provides evidence for the correlation between cognition and inflammation. Strategies should be devised by which elderly populations can access rich dietary sources of phylloquinone to maintain cognition.

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Publication

Nutritional Neuroscience; 23 (8), pp. 591-599

Publisher

Taylor and Francis Ltd

Note

peer-reviewed

Other Funding information

Allen Foundation Inc.Michigan, USA, SFI, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine

Language

English

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