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An investigation into the effects of music psychosocial interventions on the well-being of people living with dementia and their family carers

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posted on 2022-10-12, 13:02 authored by Sophie Elizabeth Lee
Dementia can negatively impact the well-being of people living with dementia and their family carers. Existing research suggests that music interventions may be effective, safe alternatives to pharmacological interventions for the promotion of well-being in people living with dementia, with lesser evidence for family carers. This research project consists of three studies which address specific gaps in this literature. Study 1 is an integrative review of existing literature on the impact of music psychosocial interventions on the health and well-being of family carers of people living with dementia, and how they experience and perceive these interventions. It found that music psychosocial interventions may improve family carers’ social and emotional well-being, enhance their ability to cope and care, and ameliorate the caring relationship, contributing to experiences of flourishing. However, it highlighted that this area is under-researched, pointed to the need for larger, more rigorous studies, and observed a prevalence of null results for quantitative measures. Study 2 investigated (a) the role of music in early-stage dementia and (b) the impact of a community-based group singing intervention on the well-being of people living with early-stage dementia and their family carers. It employed a sequential embedded mixed methods design. It found music to be beneficial and accessible in early-stage dementia. It also found that participation in a community-based group singing intervention may contribute to multidimensional enhancement of well-being for people living with early stage dementia and their family carers. Study 3 was qualitative and investigated facilitators’ experiences and perceptions of dementia-inclusive group singing during COVID-19. It found that some people living with dementia may have the capacity to engage in online music programmes, but challenges of digital inclusion exist. The ability of online music programmes to foster social connection was also observed. Further research is required to extend the findings of Studies 2 and 3 due to the small sample sizes utilised. The findings of this research project contribute to a growing body of evidence of the capacity of music interventions to improve the well-being of people living with dementia and their family carers. They provide support for the increased provision and accessibility of music psychosocial interventions for these populations

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Using the Cloud to Streamline the Development of Mobile Phone Apps

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History

Degree

  • Doctoral

First supervisor

Moss, Hilary

Note

peer-reviewed

Other Funding information

IRC

Language

English

Department or School

  • Irish World Academy of Music & Dance

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